People. Process. Service.
People. Process. Service.

Episode 14 · 2 years ago

The Post-COVID-19 Future of the Hiring Industry

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The hiring industry, like every industry the world over, has been forced to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic and find unique ways to come out of this unprecedented period stronger than ever.

“The effect of this on the employment side has been, obviously, devastating,” said Bill Kasko, Frontline Source Group President and CEO. “This has been so much different than a recession that we can kind of see coming over the hill. As the clouds roll in, we can prepare for it, and we know what’s coming. This just hit us all out of the blue.”

For Frontline, itself, that’s meant adapting to remote work requirements, assessing the implications of returning to the office across a wide range of industries, and more.

While Kasko said the industry effectively “fell off a cliff” in the wake of the pandemic, six months later, there are signs of hope.

“I’m happy to report that, six months into this, recovery is happening,” he said. “It’s slow, and it’s in different sectors. … But I will tell you that Texas is very strong. Texas is back on the right path, and it’s happening. It’s just not happening like we want.”

In particular, the hospitality, restaurant and travel industries are still struggling to rebound, exemplifying a more widespread impact that previous economic events, which often targeted fewer sectors.

To continue working toward recovery, Kasko said the emphasis needs to be on the portion of the population still working and on the people, processes and service that have enabled some companies to weather the storm more effectively than others.

“There wasn’t a book on this, so we’re doing the best we can to get people back to work. … I told someone the other day, we’re at 11% unemployment,” he said. “That’s still 89% of the people working. We need to focus on that.”

No matter the industry. Leaders need to hold these things dear. Who we serve, how we serve, why we serve? This is people process service, a frontline source group PODCAST. Welcome back to people process service. Everyone. I'm Tyler Kern and I'm thrilled to be joined once again by Bill Casco. Bill, it's been a while, man. I'll tell you. I think your hair shorter. It might be, I don't you may have some gray hair. It's been crazy. I look down the other day and realize it's been six months. Six months. That's we were last sitting in this room having a discussion. Can you even believe it? No, now I really can't. And you know, today is really about just kind of catching up and yeah and saying hey, we're back. We waited a while to to let everything kind of calm down, try to figure out exactly what's going on, obviously, and to understand, as we keep telling people, there's this new norm, the new way that we're doing business in the new way that were even from a podcast standpoint and bringing guests in and I don't know, there's so many things to kind of touch on and talk about that it's great to be back here and at least for us getting back to the norm as well and the podcast. So we're excited about this. Yeah, yeah, I'm excited to have you guys back up here in the studio and this just feels feels like my return to the office is somewhat complete now now that you're here. We're doing another podcast. It's crazy. I'm only coming into the office three days a week, and so even that has changed. I always had discussed and talked about working from home, not having to come in so much, and I think over the years everybody forced me, Hey, do that, do that, and I would say, Oh, I'm going to do that, I'm going to work from home, and then I would never work from home and now it was like we were forced to work at home and then slowly being able to get back into the GROOVE. But you know this, this whole thing is obviously there's so many different avenues and things to discuss, and so, you know, part of our show has always been discussing the people, the process and the service, our philosophy, and we really have never discussed our business and what frontline source group really does. And the effect of this on the employment side has been obviously devastating. This has been so much different than a recession that we kind of can see coming over the hills and as the clouds roll in, we prepare for it, we know what's coming. This just hit us all out of the blue and so, from from our side in the industry, it affected us greatly. I mean when they talk about falling off a cliff, it was a cliff. I mean we went right off the cliff. The good news is, and I'm happy to report six months into this and recovery happening. It is happening everybody. So it's slow and it's different sectors and it's not one area and it's want, not one location. But I will tell you Texas is very strong. Texas is a definitely back on that the right path, and it's happening. It's just not happening like we want. It's not happening for...

...the certain sectors and certain industries, the hospitality their restaurant business, the travel airline business, I mean it's just those are the areas that are being hit. You know, we've been through these different recessions where oil and gas was the one that was hit, and so we went through that entire industry just being devastated, but this is an unusual situation for us. Yeah, and and understanding the regulation. I mean, let understanding the virus before we even the regulation. Yeah, trying to stay on top of the government regulation, trying to stay on top of the government putting out guidelines and then changing it less than twenty four hours later, and then not understanding which way do we go, and then having to having to obviously deal with people that are that become sick from the virus or, you know, as sad as it is, that that are passing away from it being affected. And I think when, when all of us have gone through this, in the beginning it was I don't know anybody yet, I don't know anybody, and then you would start Oh, I know that person. Yeah, and then it starts hitting closer to home and we we've been through so many ups and downs. And so the last six months, just as everybody said, I mean it's just a new world, it's a new time and it's unbelievable. There wasn't a book on this. And so we're doing the best we can to put people back to work, and part of that getting back to work as US getting back to the regular parts of our day as well, and and this podcast and talking about the strong companies that are going to make it through, the strong companies because they had the right people in place, they had process, which is a huge thing for us to really talk about, and they're giving the right service. I told someone the other day we're at eleven percent unemployment, let's call it okay, that's still eighty nine percent of the people working, and ready to focus on that, that we're still at that number and that that's really a great number to look at and to discuss, because there are a lot of great companies out there that have figured out how to do this, and that's part of that discussion today is catching up and understanding. What are we looking at going forward? What are we going to do, and how does this all play out? Yeah, yeah, one of the things that I've I've been really curious to ask you is because you guys were in business before the ore eight recession and went through that and I'm really curious just to hear from your perspective compare and contrast the two circumstances, because obviously they're different, but how were they different and how they've been different for you and the industry that you work in that? That's a great question. And so you know that recession, depression, whatever we want to call it right complete debacle. was goes back again to that analogy that it was the storm. We could we could see the clouds coming over the hills. And so it didn't happen overnight. It was gradual. It was a six to nine month kind of process that went through of credit markets tightening up, our clients...

...not paying bills and slowly company seeing issues in different supply chains that were taking place and the housing market that that that took place, businesses having to kind of figure out how are they going to make it or not make it, and so there were guidelines and things to follow and we watched it. We really watched a really great market from hiring really slowly and painfully kind of go over the cliff and start to slow down and layoffs take place. And that was an eighteen month at least kind of process we went through of watching it bottom out and then, as it rebounded, slowly start to come back and and so the thing with that was that you had companies that were in business but had scaled back. They had to you know, analyze or cash low how do we make it longer? What's taking place? The outlooks were unknown, and then there were so many different parts of that, because it didn't affect one sector. You know, we would have the housing market start to the bubble and the breakage of all of the mortgage side of things, but then we also had gas prices go through the roof. All of a sudden. We were paying like for fifty five dollars a gallon, and so you had a lot of multiple fronts that you were fighting at the same time. This time it just happened overnight, Huh. I mean it literally took place in a well, I think in my mind, as I look back and think about it, and to share some of this, my wife and I were in Hawaii. We we actually had been gone for two weeks and in we were in Kauai and it was completely you had no idea this was going on. I mean there was talk about it, it was like, oh, it's like a flu, Lah Blah. You know, we had already been flying on planes and wiping down our seats and the trade tables and everything else, but it was like oblivious. You know, there was a discussion. It was like, and I don't think this is any big deal. That was February fifteen through the end of the month, and so came back that first week in March and I started saying, guys, I think this is actually going to be a little bit worse. Yeah, this this just seems to be something that we need to be concerned about. And then as we started to watch it, it was within two weeks that it just changed. It completely went over the edge of the cliff and we watched in a matter of just a couple weeks what took place, from the shutdowns to no hiring, to the layoffs to closing of the businesses. But what's interesting more than anything about this entire side of thing from a business standpoint was that in two thousand and seven and eight, we were really not prepared internally with a process to be able to handle everyone overnight working from home. And part of that was what allowed us to flip a switch send everyone home because of the...

...technology that we had implemented over the past twelve years and upgraded all of our systems to voice over, Ip two laptops to technology and enabling us to be able to do videos, all of our electronic documents, and we had gone we're pretty much at ninety nine. I would say pre Covid we are like ninety nine percent paperless to now, which is almost a hundred percent. But having all of that process and place allowed us to literally flip flip a switch, send everyone home, change the way we were doing business and say we're up and running still, and we really didn't miss anything. Yeah, we did have the business either because people weren't hiring. But again a lot of our clients were able to do that as well. We were very lucky to be ab we we had a lot of a lot of clients that had to let people go. We had a lot of clients, about twenty percent, I would say, actually twenty, maybe up to twenty percent. That of they're out of business today. But we we had vital individuals that were on contract with us of contractors and our temporary side of our business and then our permanent placement, our direct our side of our business obviously stopped, and so we watched as these companies figured out how they were going to do it, and that was kind of our philosophy was you got to figure it out. Every company is going to have to figure out how do we operate in this different business setting. How do we operate with separation? How do we operate, you know, for years we all talked about our company culture. How do we create a company culture still and have this? And so in the beginning it was almost as if they said, okay, forget all of that. I mean, that's out the door. Well, we need to do is figure out how to survive and and that's what they did. And so companies went into survival mode. And so, because it was such a difference and it wasn't something that anybody could have predicted and that it wasn't something that any company caused, this was something that, thankfully, the government came in with, you know, loans to help businesses. And so the PPP was really probably in my lifetime, that most outside of the box thinking, to say, how do we save people's jobs, how do we keep people employed as many as we can, because if we don't, they're not going to be able to feed their families, are not going to be able to make payments on things? How do we do this in a way to keep small businesses running, which is fifty five percent of the GDP in this country? How do we keep this this incredible wheel that was churning and creating jobs going so that it doesn't overflow the states, because the states are not going to be able to fund all of this. And did they made mistakes? Yes,...

...they absolutely made mistakes and, as I said in the beginning, part of that is the government regulation that they put out that would change. We didn't know it's working, it's not working. We're going to do this, we're not going to do that. But at the end of the day they did something. They did something to help businesses. Now, I kind of took the philosophy of just do something, will figure out what it's going to cost us later, but we got to get through this. And so they did that. They did things with the unemployment MMM so that people could still feed their families, could still make payments on things. They did help. No, they didn't do it a hundred percent correct. There's no way they would have ever done it a hundred percent and, by the way, there is no way this country's ever going to agree that they ever did everything perfect. So let's forget it. But at least they did something. So we made a movement in the right place. Are and you know, it's that whole idea that generations are going to pay for this, and I said that when they did this. If you think that we're not going to have to pay for this down the road, guys, we're going to pay for it. But at least we're getting through it. At least it wasn't a true depression. I mean we could have been in a depression so quickly with people, which was just so sad to see. Not only did we have people being sick, not only did we have people dying, but when you looked at the food lines of people out getting food from the food banks and the number that we're having to do that, it just it was sickening. I mean we still had people that didn't get all of the benefits because they truly were on unemployment before. They truly didn't go on to unempoyment because of the covid so there were gaps, there were problems, but business had businesses had to figure out how do we maintain how do we survive, how do we take care of our people? What's the best thing to do? And what we watched and observed from a Tenzero foot level was that our clients for resilient. Our clients and companies figured it out and they did exactly what the entrepreneurial side of this country is built on. Is that they figured it out. They were either going to make it or not, and so we watch them take care of their people the best they could. Yes, you had to have people furloughed, but then they were bringing them back. A lot of companies didn't fur they'll furlough them for as long as people had anticipated. And so even for us, we had to make a change. Our business dropped at one point. The true number is it was seventy percent off and we didn't have a choice. And so we had to make hard decisions to to unfortunately furlough. I had been talking about this and that we had needed to watch it for really it was the total time was probably about four weeks. I couldn't promise that we weren't going to have to make tough decisions, but I said we will figure it out and get through it, and we did, and we had to make tough decisions and you know, I'm very happy to say at this point, second day of September, that we're sitting here...

...everyone that we had for a lowed we brought back or allowed to come back. Now. Some didn't want to, some during the furlough time, found another opportunity and took it, and that's great. I mean we're sorry to see them go. We did the best that we could do with what we had. I'm also happy to say that the hiring is back and we've been very lucky to obtain new clients, to obtain new opportunities, but we also became very creative and entrepreneurial, to say. Let's we weren't in the healthcare industry. Let's put it that way first right. We weren't doing healthcare things and we were approached with people to take temperatures and we were like, okay, but it was a need and we said we'll figure out how to find these people, and so we started doing that and that led us from the temperature taking people to then being involved in the people actually doing the swabbing and the testing across the state of Texas on the contract at these test sites with the all of these healthcare people, which is not anything that we would have ever done. But I was reminded of during the hurricanes in Houston when our vice president at the time approached me because he had been approached because there was a group that it was the Spca they had been approaching companies to take care of dog they needed dog walkers and Houston and and they approached us because someone had referred and said call frontline. These guys. They'll look at anything and, you know, see if they can figure out how to make it work. And I told him I got On't I don't know. I mean, I don't even know about the workman's cop on that. How do we do that? How do we get that? And I said what are we really looking at? And he said there's over thirtyzero dogs and cats, wow, that are misplaced and they're all at the reliance center and they need help and and the SBCA needs help. And so we actually did the deal with the SBCA and it lasted for almost nine months and had we put I don't know, Fifty, seventy five people to work walking dogs every day and it there were full time positions until every last animal was moved to a different location. And so I was reminded that in times of need we've always looked at different ways to do business. And so we took a look, at a stab at this and sure enough, we did it. And so today we have we're staffing in the state of Texas and different locations all across the state. We actually have a group of people that on Monday, with the same group, flew to Michigan. There in Michigan doing testing in the state. They're in Detroit my understanding and helping out, and so it's opened up doors two things, which for us was being creative, and so it was about our people, which it goes totally back to our whole discussion that our companies, along with ours, had to figure out how do we do things. But we had the right people in place and we had the right attitude, and so our people were willing to do whatever it was going to take to be...

...successful. We're willing to do whatever it was going to take to make sure that our great company that we had created on our sixteen year was going to make it through, and so it was one one opportunity after another that we kind of took on. But because we had the right people in place and because our process to operate had been true and tested over the years, because we knew that with the right people that our process would work, we didn't miss a beat that we were able to take something like this on and and it tested us and let me tell you. There were things that we've never had to do before that we had to figure out how to do and and actually, I think, made us better sure because we were able to understand and actually even some of our software. We didn't realize that it would work like that and we're able to go in and actually have some things customized to make us even more efficient, that we were able to go to the next sect, to next section, to give that service to not only our client, but we felt like we were giving a service back to the community, into the country as a whole and doing our part, which has been kind of that feeling from our clients when we have these conversations, that they're trying to get back to work, they're trying to put people back to work, they have a need. We still are a very industrial company or country that that has to produce things and companies want to be back to work. So right the contrast between the two times, it's just doesn't even compare. I mean it's just two different situations. But we did utilize that mindset of operating like it was a recession and that we cut back on our expenses and areas, looked at our budgets very close looked at our people to make sure, hey, we have enough staffing for that. We internally where we're at, and then we've continued to look for additional internal staff. Even for us, I mean we're, just like everyone else, very cautious about what's happening right now. But the two are so different. There's they're very, very different. And the mindset, because now we're also not as close niche. We're not all back in the office, we're not in an environment where we're all sitting next to each other. We're not able to do some of the same things that we were able to do before. Thank God every day that all of us have been well. Now, at this point, the numbers all so, I mean you know, all of us, I think, look at the numbers and go, I don't know what to believe. They're behind and reporting the numbers. The testing centers aren't as busy as they were before. I can tell you that, which is a positive. But I think people are going to the testing centers when they truly believe that they're sick. So the numbers that are reported from a positive rate are going to be higher because when it wasn't like that, we actually actually was on site at one of them and in talking with people that are coming through the sites, you know the discussion as well. Are Yet? Do you have any symptoms now? Oh, are you here? I just want to get tested. So...

...you didn't have you had a lot of people just wanted to get tested to get that, you know, reassurance sharing. So but now you have people that are truly are they have symptoms and they need to know for sure. But you also have testing centers everywhere now, I mean private side, doing testing, and so there's definitely a lot more. The ability to go out and have a test now is a lot different than was six months ago. But again, I know we all question things and I I don't know, it's such a hot, hot sports opinion on this whole thing that how do you look at it and say, I don't know that there's any right or wrong. But if we ever anybody thinks that for a moment the government's ever going to get a hundred percent right, that you're crazy. There never it doesn't matter who's running it, it's never going to be a hundred percent correct. There's always going to be flaws in the stuff and I think the best thing is that we've all learned earned, you know, to do things different. But there's also other positives that have come out of this. One of the things to me, I think, when we talk about the differentiating of the two times, is you look at families. You look at the way that families have come closer together. In many ways you didn't really have a choice if you were stuck together, and so that that's been an interesting positive. I laughed the other day because someone said, you know, there's there are no positives that have come from this. I'm like, now there are. I mean, look, I'm not going to lie. I really was never watching Netflix before. I didn't. I didn't really get it, which is kind of crazy because I'm kind of a technology guy. But now you know, I did and it was sucked into different shows and brought you to the twenty three D it. It really did, and now it's like Ozarks, I want to see them, that I want to see for it season three. So you know, I don't know. I mean there are things that that enlightened us, I guess, two different areas that we can kind of now laugh about, and yet there's a lot of darkness and sadness to it, and so you don't want to do that and, of course, politically and everything else that's gone on, it's just it's just sad and in the discussions that need to take place should be taking place and, you know, doing the right thing is what we need to do and moving forward. It's just so many different things happen this time that it wasn't just a recession or something it. Yes, it was this pandemic, along with social unrest and a rising and people finally having people have these discussions and look at things and and then, on top of it were in the middle of this political time of an election and the all the craziness on top. So, yeah, six months later, I look at it and is it is it the same now? It's totally a different situation. Yeah, one of the things that stood out to me, just in talking to a number of companies during this time and getting their perspective, is that the companies that have done particularly...

...well have been innovative and adaptable throughout this time, just able to make quip pivots, and I think that that relies a lot on people and process and having a process that you're confident in, but also one that's able to flex given the situation right you have to be able to trust people that they're still going to do their jobs to the best of their abilities when they're working from home and and more out of sight, let's say. And so I think that that is really driven things home for me, just the the importance of people, process service during this time. But even with that, the ability to flex as needed and process is obviously going to look different when you have more people working from home. That's just that's just how it is. But companies that have been able to innovate using their process and companies that have been able to be adaptable and show those qualities, I think have have have shown well during this time. And I get that particular industries are going to struggle more than others and you can be the most innovative restaurant in the world, you're still not going to be doing what you were doing this time last yeear. But those have been some of the hallmarks of things that have stood out to me just about the companies that have that have succeeded during this time. Yeah, and you know it's crazy. So in our industry, from a staffing side, staffing industry overall, you know, it's always been about having the people in the office you're making so many phone calls and you you it's office driven and activity driven. And so one of our very close friends in the business coming out of Denver called Bradsby Group, and Ron shacket in Greg pay that run the company. It's interesting, you know, they had at the time like a hundred and twenty five recruiters working in their office and all in their office, hundred and twenty even wild location, and and they weren't set up to go remote. And so when this hit, it was a quick snap that all of a sudden they had to change and adapt. And so part of that is how businesses change the way they're doing things, and so it's going to be interesting to see how that plays out and the long run for them and for businesses that are doing that, because it's not just one sector. I mean think about call centers. I mean call centers can operate the same way, right, and so these open formats at jp Morgan Chase and I think about these buildings and downtown, you know, in Manhattan and for example, let's say, and you've got floors upon floors of these just open concept thing. How are they going to operate? Yeah, how can they bring the people back in and operating. So you start thinking about that in the fallout from different industries and what's going to happen. That's the piece that we haven't seen yet from this that I don't know that we will until sometime next year, which is interesting because even thinking about people that we interviewed for the podcast over the past year, going back to and one of the things I know that we've been discussing and talking about is really we're going to do a show where we're going to recap and go back to these people. I mean, I want to go back to Scott Low at G and I want to have a conversation and I want I want to hear from Scott about architect and what's happening in the commercial side across this country. And you...

...think about all of these different areas where they were involved in designing retail stores and commercial buildings and hotels. You know they had just opened the Virgin Hotel here in Dallas that they designed and how is that going to change their business? Or I think about Bobby Brajs at with Perrot and their company and the healthcare side and having bobby come back in to really discuss the healthcare side. I mean, what is it done with their business? Because you would think, oh, it's healthcare, automatically it's through the roof. It's got to be. But is it and how's IT affecting share? And then you know Kyle noon in and I think about kyle with his rustic restaurants and bowl and barrel and you think about everything going out. I saw kyle do an interview on CNBC during this and was discussing they were opening up a brand new rustic in San Antonio. How is that affected the restaurant business? We know it's been devastating, but how are they getting through that and what did they change and how did they have things in place that would allow them to have that success moving forward? And then you know, it's so ironic that the last person we did a podcast with, an interviewed was Michael Gordon and if you guys remember, Michael was a CO founder of teldoc. I mean this guy was one of the founders. Climbing a mountain, right, was it Kilmajaro or something? And it right, yeah, and he comes with this idea to create this teledoc thing where you can talk to doctors remotely. And what was the whole discussion. During the beginning of this whole it was about Tele Dooc and about being able to use tell a medicine. And then, on top of that, you know he's doing this whole space program and going back to the moon. And during this whole side, what do we get? We get SPACEX that successfully launches lands, launches lands since to the International Space Station. This rocket. I want to have Michael, I want to talk to him and here, not only about teldoc but about his thing to back to the moon and wow, things that were are happening during something like this. Something positive does come out of all of it, and so I just think, you know, looking at the changes and the process that people had in place, it will be very interesting to have these conversations not only about all of the ones that we visited last year, or in this year rather, but even looking at going forward, about businesses and the commercial and real estate side of things. One of our one of the guests we're going to have on here in the next couple weeks is become a friend as a gentleman by the name of David Cobb out of Florida, who interesting stories, commercial real estate broker, runs a successful business there in Florida and really can't wait to have him on and really discuss what's happening in Florida, because you had all these people exiting New York. Guess what they were headed to Florida. And and I heard some numbers on housing prices in Florida that are it's stupid...

...crazy how much they've been based with what's going on there. But but David invited me to be a part of a book that he's writing in a chapter we did together, and so we're going to have David on. But it's interesting. David's grandfather was the famous baseball player ty Cobb and just a really interesting guy. But I think to have him on and understand what's taking place in the commercial side, especially in Florida, is going to be interesting. So kind of excited about kind of moving forward with the the podcast and talking about the different areas and avenues. And then we have a lot of other guests that were talking with who want to come on, who are already scheduled to come on before all of this hit, and just kind of jump starting this and getting back into it is going to be exciting and fun and you know, as I've said, before, not only from a business side, but even this. We're going to figure out how to do this. We're going to do some things different. We're talking about doing some more video side of things, almost a TV show, yeah, which is exciting, to do these video interviews, and you've had me do a couple with you guys on your shows, which is exciting. And so I think we're going to utilize the video zoom side of things and do these TV shows a little bit more because, again, our reach is a lot different and we're realizing the technology we don't have to come into the studio necessarily every time when we can now do so many things remote, and so we're going to kind of figure it out as we go forward to yeah, that's been a big innovative thing. I think it's just everyone realizes, okay, I can, I can get comfortable using zoom and all of a sudden I just have a really quick, easy way to record video. So right, why not turn around and make some content out of it and, you know, Evangelize Your Business More? You know, it was before Covid we had already been doing video interviews. Yeah, for like eight, nine years solid. Sure in the last five years we stopped completely bringing people into our office as and what to video interviews because it was more convenient for the person. On top of it, the job market being as tight as it was from an employment side, people didn't have time, they were working, and so that's why we were so ahead of the curve. But it the employers were still anequated back to the that kind of think of it as an analog time frame where they wanted to be in person for every interview. They weren't open to doing the videos. But man has it changed. Now it's like, okay, we're speeding up, and I kind of correlate that to the idea of and actually saw this the other day. Somebody was still using all as or email address, but it was the difference between the dial up Modem and going to the you know, the fiber on Internet. Yeah, so all of a sudden everybody realized which again that was another thing that was interesting, was to find out even our internal staff, when we sent them home to work, they were like, Oh, my internet speed is only like a three megabyte. I'm like what I do? Oh, yeah, I really don't use it every do everything on my phone and you're like, yeah, you're going to need to...

...get that upgraded and at all of a sudden you found out that, wow, there were people that were way behind. And that was another part of that curve was you had industries that were extremely busy, between cable and ATNT or rising share, all of a sudden doing these upgrades and people are like what, I got to wait thirty days to have something installed, and they're like yeah, it's going to take you a little bit, so I don't it's just it's crazy. Yeah, well, it feels like we jampacked like five years of innovation in the span of, you know, three months right at the beginning of this and then spent the last three months just getting comfortable. It was already there, it was it was there. That was the ready to happen. It just takes sometimes, it just takes a kick in the pants sometimes to actually jump you into doing some of this stuff. And that's one of the things in my online shopping. Yeah, right about that. Yeah, think about that success that just took off, you know. And did you ever think in your wildest imagination you would go to a grocery store and be able to lay down on the shelves? I mean, think about that. I mean, I never, I mean talk about toilet paper SCIARS. Yeah, are you kidding me? I went to cooker like three weeks into this thing and it was dang near apocalyptic looking in there. You just walked an you're like, there's no meat here on the middle counter. It's just weird scenes. Yeah, I just never would have imagined somebody actually saying, do you have any extra toilet paper? You're like, excuse me, and you know, and stock piling of supplies that consisted of Lysol toilet paper, chlorox wipes, paper towels, and you're like what is quote, this is insane. And so this is something that, you know, we will live through. We're going to get through all of this. All of us that have had to get through this will be able to tell the stories. Their generations of kids will. We're just these are stories that we will tell and tell and tell of what we had to go through. And and I kind of related back to is we look at history and we think about eleven, we think about people that when when I tell stories about the day after not eleven, or or actually even the day that evening after eleven and sitting at home and on the back patio and it. The silence that took place was unbelievable. It reminded me almost of a Christmas Eve and many times where there's just there are no cars, there's there's just no sound. Occasionally it here in airplane, but that night you heard absolutely nothing. Yeah, and when I tell that story, people are like, I wasn't like that, and you're like, oh, yeah, it was. It was like that. There was no gas. I mean there was a gas run, we didn't run out of toilet paper, but it was all these other things. So this time it's just crazy to think that we went through that, but it did. It brought I think it brought us together as a as a race, better as a just the human factor of things. Then we'll get through this together, and we will and and I feel, I feel...

...on the other side of it. It's I can't sit here and say it yet. It's all great and better. There's no way. Yeah, but is it improving? Every day? We every day we need to take a step forward. Some days we take five steps backwards, and that's the way it's going to be. That's that's life. But we have to learn from mistakes, we have to move forward with things and we just have to. We just have to keep pressing forward for all of us. It's a time for the history books and there's been a podcast for the history books. I think. Yeah, yeah, well, I'm really excited to be back. Yeah, and Tyler was. Honestly, we we walked in the door and you know you're not supposed to shake and I'm like, screw it, I'm shaking and I'm hugging man. We're back. I'm not reading. We got we got to get back. Yeah, and so, yeah, it may not be the right thing to do, but we're going to we're back. It's the it's the reintroduction. We're going to go over to go US get our pure l out and we're all down. But yeah, but it's great to be back. Well, it's great to have you back. I'm excited to keep moving forward with this. So, Bill Casco, frontline source group, thanks for being here me. Thank you, Tyler. Make sure you guys. We had a little snap food with apple and our podcast during the the break too, but it should all be back up there. You guys. Appreciate you listening, sharing comments and everything else. The email addresses media relations at frt LINECOM. If you have ideas people you like to hear. We'd love to hear that as well. Yes, send those in. Send those in. Make sure you subscribe there, on Apple podcast or spotify, where have you get your podcast these days? And we'll be back soon with more episodes, but until then I've been your host to day Tyler, current for Bilk Asco. We'll talk again soon. Thanks everyboddy.

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