People. Process. Service.
People. Process. Service.

Episode 10 · 2 years ago

Entrepreneurship is My Jam

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Dr. Cortney Baker is an award-winning entrepreneur, the host of the podcast "Women in Business: Inspirational Stories of Women Entrepreneurs with Dr. Cortney", a TEDx speaker and a nationally recognized authority on women’s leadership. Baker is also the CEO of KidsCare Home Health, a multi-million-dollar healthcare organization with 12 locations across Texas, Colorado and Idaho. She stopped by Frontline Source Group's, People, Process, Service, podcast to talk about her journey and her passion for entrepreneurship and mentoring future women leaders.

Asked about the No. 1 thing she’s learned when it comes to working with people, Baker said, “Hire smarter than you. The people you surround yourself with in your organization are so important, and they need to be intelligent, driven, and determined.” Baker wants to hire people who could work for any healthcare organization, but choose to work for KidsCare Home Health.  In the past several years, Baker’s company has grown to multiple locations and more than 650 employees across several states. What was the secret sauce that made her company so successful, while similar, more established companies did not experience the same growth?   Baker attributed success to several factors, including the company’s process of hiring the best people and providing the best service.

Baker’s passion is entrepreneurship, and she takes pride in mentoring women to become the leaders of today and tomorrow.  “What are the challenges we face as women in the workforce?,” Baker said. “When I looked at the research and the four most common factors contributing to these challenges, the common denominator was confidence, (and) 80% of the women I talk to say they lack confidence.”   That's what drives Baker to help other women start and scale service-based businesses. Entrepreneurship is Baker’s jam, and she may have the perfect recipe for success.

Contributor: Dr. Cortney Baker and Bill Kasko CEO, Frontline Source Group

No matter the industry leaders need to hold these things dear. Who we serve, how we serve, why we serve? This is people process service, a frontline source group PODCAST. Lord One, welcome to another episode of People Process Service. I'm tyler. Current across the room is Bill Casco. Bill, good to see men. Hardy Tyler's nice to see you. After a last week. I was able to walk out of the building, so I felt like that was success. You know, if you haven't listened to last week, I will tell you I listen to it in about thirty minutes into it. I'm glad we were walking in that driving I'm afraid I haven't seen the video yet. So the video ought to be interesting. I can actually see our editor watching it and kind of working. Cares me a little concerned. Yeah, yeah, I'm a little nervous about it. But you know what, the audio is great. This is fun. But now we're here for for another episode of People Process Service and I'm really excited about today's episode. I could, I could run down our guests. Resume her her bio, but it's pretty extensive. It's it's very long and she's a podcast veteran. Just done just about everything written books, started companies, as a leadership guru, all things along those lines. It's Dr Courtney Baker. Hey, thanks for being here, thanks for having me. It's going to be here. Absolutely so you've done just about everything in the world of leadership and everything that you've done, you know, be it's empowering women in business, growing leaders, mentoring others, has all been kind of around working with people. So, just to start off, what's maybe the number one thing that you've learned when it comes to working with people? Higher Smarter Than You? Absolutely I would have to give a big amen to that. Like you're smart, you're highired instead of because when we started it was you've got a pulse, now you're hired and and now it's definitely like can can we make sure that you are smarter than me? Then you're good to go. There's that old adage of it. If you're the smartest person in the room, find a different room, yes, around yourself with smarter people. Yeah, the other yeah. So if you're the smartest person in the company and you own it, then definitely higher smarter. It's a really good so that's actually opens up something we normally don't really talk about employment, but I think it'll kind of open up a door here when you say that. It's really simple to say. But how do you find those people? I mean, how are you? You're well connected. Obviously you know a lot of people, but is there anything that ever sticks out where you're like this one gets it? You know, it's intelligence, but it's also drive and determination and like I I'm pretty scrappy, I'll be honest, and so it's like if if I see somebody who is just going to come in and roll up their sleeves and get down to business, and we kind of talked about that April and I will earlier today where we were. They talked about you know, when you go on a job interview or you're talking to somebody and they said you have any questions? Make sure you have questions, and I think that's important because it doesn't only show that you were interested, but it shows that you have some initiative and drive and gumption. You know, like yeah, as a matter of fact, I do. You were kind of filling us in in the beginning or previous here about your first employee. Are you want? Would you tell that story again, because that I love that story as a great story. Oh so kids care. I'm the CEO of kids here home health. We started sixteen years ago in a little home and Garland, Texas, and I should show you my house that well as my partner's house at the time, and it was just me with ten little kids and I would drive all over the dfw area doing therapy with little kids with disabilities. And today we...

...have about six hundred and fifty employees. We are a nationwide company with eleven locations in three states and we've service at provided service for more than probably fifty, two hundred thousand kids with disabilities. That's incredible. Yeah, speech, physical, occupational therapy and nursing services to little kiddos. But about a year into it we started growing so fast. At about a year into our business we opened our first office and I had a partner in the beginning and so I would go out and do therapy and one day she was gone and our first hire was starting and first office higher that we didn't know and I was sitting in my office and I heard the door open. So I peeked my head around and there was this cute little Hispanic girl who looks dressed for a big girl job and I was like Oh God, does she know she's in the right place, because I got scrubs on and so I, you know, walked into the front room and she looked so, so serious and I was like, Oh, you see that box right there, that's your chair, that we're going to build that chair and that's going to be yours. And so Belinda and I got on the floor and we built her chair the first day and her her desk was one of those little I can't even tell you how small it was, but it was a small desk and I had this giant Dinosaur Monitor on it and her computer was Mydell from college. Oh my Gosh, tower this mean? You just describe like a TV tray? Yeah, yeah, five hundred pounder, it really was. Monitor. Yeah, and so, but the kicker was Blenda, was our receptionist and she had to answer the phone and we had two little cordless phones and it didn't matter where she went, including the bathroom, she would take the phone with her and she would kill me for Tell High Belinda. So she yeah, she would take the phone and have to answer the phone like no matter what. Wow, yeah, yeah, it's crazy, but we just moved into our for their fifth location. Like physical location here in Dallas, because we do all of our operations out of Addison. And it's crazy. I found a whole stack of all like tons of old stuff like that and I found one that was like we got four phone lines that I was like, you gotta be kidding me, there's no way. So I love the people process service because, I mean, if you can't get your processes down and get the right people in the bus, then no matter what kind of service you provide, you're never going to grow and scale. You got to have those pieces instrumental. And she's still with you. She's still with me sixteen years. Sixteen, so she's been with me for fifteen years out of sixteen. Yeah, and we've got I mean she's not the only one. Like we have a lot of people who we have a therapist name and she's a clinical manager now, but she started and when she came in for her interview, we basically like gave her a binder and we were in a company Christmas party. We were all like in our pajamas watching Christmas vacation, sitting on the floor, and we can't do that today. Yeah, sixteen years later, is not allowed. Yeah, and we gave her a binder and it was...

...basically like her orientation bind her. She came for an interview and she was like talk, you know, did did I get the job? And we're like Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, you start now like you have a pulse, you have a license, you're good to go, and she's still with us to care. You had a partner when you started that, and so it was just the two of you starting the company. Yeah, so when you look back at that to today, how did you know what to do? I mean when you went to to set up the company or to do your the process to run the company? Was it just you kind of winged it? God, no, my husband. So it was right after September eleven. It was two thousand and three and my hut well, two thousand too, when we first got well, when I got the hairburing idea to do it, and my husband was off, he'd been laid off, and so he was like she's going to do that. He knows me well enough to know like if it's if, if I'm talking about it's probably going to happen. So he was like she could get her but in a lot of trouble. If I don't make sure she does this right. And so, not that he's like overbearing or anything, but he went in. I don't even think Google existed then, like I don't know, but he went in and found, yeah, it's just Google, and found a company that provided consultancy services to set up Den'Al and medical offices, and so found me a consultant and in fact that consultant told me three times not to do it. Wow. Yeah, now I was like, basically, I appreciate your opinion. Do you want the job or not? And I don't know if it was pity or he needed the money, but he was like, all right, I'll help you. It was that just a precursory case that failed, just as I told you? So, yeah, maybe, Sam, maybe. So. Yeah. So he helped us. He got our at the time we were incorporated, and then we in fact it was right around February when our paperwork came in and he was he called and he was like congratulations, you are officially a company, and I was like Oh great. Well, I had started getting cold feet and going yeah, maybe I'm it's not that bad, getting complacent, and right then there was a snowstorm, or I storm in February of two thousand and three and you know when it snow, when anything falls from the sky, Dallas turns into chicken little and everybody thinks that the world is ending. So the office shut down where I was working and I was like, you know, if I don't work, I don't get paid. And I was pregnant at the time and so I was like I gotta see my kids, I got to get out, and so I drove from Plano to South Dallas projects and saw my kids and went and saw kids like I mean it was it was well over an hour commute one way just in this to get, you know, down the road and went and saw my kids, turn in my paperwork for those visits and I was like, you know, when am I going to get paid? And they said, well, you'RE gonna have to get paid next week because we didn't run paid. I mean they basically didn't run payroll in they but they said I didn't turn in my notes and I was like, the office was closed, there was no way, and they were like, well, too bad, everybody else got their paperwork in and at that point I pulled over because I was on the phone and my car and I pulled over and I remember just going okay, God, I get it, I'll do it, but I need your help, and from that point it was never a thought. I never looked back. So kids care was really born...

...that day because we were incorporated and they were jerks, my employers were jerks, and so I was like that's it. So that was in. You said that was in two thousand and two, two thousand and three. Okay, that two thousand and three. So you won the two thousand six, two thousand and seventeen Texas businesswoman of the year. I did believed that. If you told two thousand and three version of you that, would you have believed it? Did you think that, okay, one day I will attain like this level of success, or was that? Did that seem like a pipe dream to you? At the time I had no idea and in fact, when I look back at life and knowing that I started as a single teenage mom at six months after I graduated high school, my son was born and my friends went off to college and I went to the Medicaid and Food Stamps Office, I definitely would not have believed that. Well, yeah, started the company. What was the goal? What did you did you have a goal? Did you did you want to grow it to something large? What was your vision then? You know, when I started I thought if I focus on being the best employer I could be, then it doesn't matter because success will happen, success will come. But I mean as a speech pathologist and PT or occupational therapist and nurses. Now you know we could go anywhere and get a job, but I wanted someone to go. I could go there, there, there, there, but I choose to go to kids care and if I really strive every day to make sure that our culture permeates that throughout that people still choose to be there. So when you were setting it up and going through it and you start going through this growth, did you have ups and downs and with growth where all of a sudden you expanded? You heard twenty five, fifty people at a time or something, or how did that growth take place to get to six hundred and fifty employees? The growth has been pretty gradual, but it's been I mean it's been spurts, but definitely like gradual spurts, if that makes sense. You know, we really started putting our name out there and getting it and it's interesting because I look back at like companies who existed even before we were and they were open, and now we are like so much larger and diversified, and I'm like, why did we get to where we are, and and what made what was the secret sauce, basically, to our growth? And I think it's it's, I mean now it's God has this hand on this company, but it's also the fact that we set ourselves up process wise and to hire, hire for being smooth, you know, smarter than me. That's why we grew. Yeah, that's incredible. So when we talked about leadership and we talked about training leaders and that sort of thing, do you believe that anybody can grow into a leader? Do you feel like there are some people that are born with certain traits that make them more likely to become that or and some people just don't have those types of things? I agree with that. There are some people who are just natural born leaders. Yeah, and then you can also develop as well. It's not like, oh, honey, you're a lost cause, but you know, there's definitely people who are innate leaders and people who are developed leaders, because when I hear your story and I hear kind of some of the things that you did, you able to accomplish, I think there's no way that I could do that like a you know, I just just hearing your personal story. I'm like wow,...

...like that's incredible. That took a lot of leadership, strength, you know, vision, a lot of work and that sort of thing, and I look at that mesolutely. That's no, that's probably not in me, you know, and so I like I admire seeing that in you. But as you kind of go around it and you speak to people and you talk a little bit more about empowering women and leadership, how do you how do you help draw that out of people? I suppose well, you have and I would challenge that it's not in you, because if you have the desire and the drive to do it, then you know that saying where there's a will, there's a way, and I believe that, like, if that's something that you strive to do, then you can make it happen. But so many of us hold ourselves back because of confidence. And that was actually when I went back to school and focused on women leaders, especially in the healthcare setting, and finding out why there are so few women leaders when we're fifty percent of the population. The Pool of employment and I looked at what are the factors that, you know, the challenges that we face it, and found that there are four main challenges and the common denominator of all four was confidence. How many women specifically lacked confidence? First of all, Ya are much smarter than us. I'm the S and the story. Yeah, I'll, I mean I have noe saying that. I'm very proud of it. I'm very proud of my life. Is Way smarter than me, way yeah, and every every one that I employ, I feel the same way. But I think part of that is especially when there's opportunity for women work place. I think some of that I feel and just my opinion, but I think a lot of it comes from the mail holding someone back from having that opportunity to express well, and that's interesting that you say that, because my research found that there were four main challenges. Oh, I maybe totally wrong here, that women go through, and you know, and I challenge the whole concept of this glass ceiling, because I personally don't believe that there's a glass ceiling. And let me talk about the challenges first and then we can go back to the class ceiling. So they're the four main challenges that are specific to women's career advancement are so the first one is family obligations and raising a family and growing a career as is tough, especially if you don't have support. It's next to impossible. The second one is limited advancement opportunities. So maybe you get so far in your career and you're like, I love it where I am, but I'm not fulfilled when I look at my career and I want to advance my career. So where do I go? Or you know, women were talking about how they felt like they were kind of at this point where they were in this mucky situation with age. You know, I'm not ready to retire, but I don't know what I really want to do. The third was gender based discrimination. Now I went into my research really thinking it was going to be the good old boys club holding women back. And there are instances of who I lovingly refer to as Bubba, and bubba still out there and you know, like that overweight left at his own jokes and rubs his belly and says hey sugar, you know him, Buba. So he is still out there and hey bubs and then, but really, more women talked about how many women hold women back, and that had been oh yeah, yeah, we are without a doubt our own worst enemies. So gender based discrimination is three facets. There's men, there's...

...women holding women back, and then there's also stereotypes. So when women act like a strong assertive leader, they're called a bitch, but when men act like a strong assertive leader, they're called a damn good leader. And so that's it's called the double bind and I've heard a hole before to well, yeah, I mean not you, but yeah, sure it's been made. Or I'm sure I've been called plenty of things. And you know, the the double bind is very real and it's very understated the impact that it has on women. But then the fourth challenge that women talked about in the research was how they lacked confidence. Nearly eighty percent of women that I talked to talk to me a complete stranger about how they lacked confidence. And these were, I mean some of these women were sea level women. And you know, if we look at the the research that's done by Mackenzie and company, along with lean in, we are more than a hundred years away from gender equality at this sea level and that pisses me off. And that's I mean. I have two daughters, twelve and sixteen, and that's why I help women today start and scale their own service base businesses, because I don't I hate corporate America, but it's not my jam. Entrepreneurship is my jam. So I feel like you know, if I can help women do what I know how to do, and that's start and scales businesses, then we can decrease the gender gap through the power of entrepreneurship. Right now, we can talk about the glass ceiling now if you want to, or I can let you so, okay, I like to hear about this. Okay. So I disagree with believing that there's a glass ceiling, and the reason why is because if you tell a little girl there's going to be this object that's going to stand in your way and you can't see it, touch it, taste it, feel it, move it, but guess what, it's going to hold you back, good luck, honey, she has no power. But instead, if you say, okay, there's going to be these four challenges that get in your way, and let's create strategies to get beyond these four challenges and instead view your career as a maze or a labyrinth. Then you know, when you hit the turn, you're going to know, okay, I got to just make it harder or keep going to you know, this this goal that I have. I'm going to hit these challenges, but here's my strategies to keep moving and persevere in our hands, I guess. From my side, when I think about that, I mean is brutally honest as it can be. Saying it this way, I'm like, who the hell is saying that to the women, to girls in Grade School, high school, College about I mean, what are they even thinking to think something like that? That's what is blowing me away still to understand that people still do that, believe that there's a class ceiling. Oh well, yeah, it's just it's just hard for me to understand. I would never tell my daughter that. My daughter would be to say you can do anything you want to do. Nothing is going to stop you if you have a plan, a drive. This is where you got to have the plan. You have to lay it out. Nothing will get in your way and and I think that part of that is probably being raised by a single mom as who struggled through that time and it was extremely successful with for kids in Plano Texas. I mean that was crazy. Yeah, but I when I look at it today,...

I think I do see it and I see it with other companies and it just kind of, like you, it pisses me off. Well, I think that very not too long ago there was a very real glass ceiling and and that women would no matter what. There was like the Bro Code and women couldn't advance. But now, with with the the way that laws and equality and I feel like we are in a time where now we can do anything we set our mind to, as long as we have the drive and the perseverance. But women are holding themselves back. So there's a professor at Ohio state that defined confidence as the stuff that turns thoughts into actions. Richard Petty is his name, and I thought about that and I was like, you know, I don't know if I believe that, because hamsters in a wheel or in motion and they're not confident, they're stupid. So what is confidence? How if that's going to be our construct, how do you define that? And I came up with my own theory that confidence is actually found at the intersection of courage to know your purpose and faith to walk in that purpose and at that intersection is where your your confidence lies. Very, very interesting. Yeah, that's fascinating. So when you try to when you're helping new entrepreneurs to get out there, we mean, what's other than obviously surrounding yourself with the best people? Is there something? Is there another secret sauce that you give them that is something unique you really that's expect I see. Well, the Book Bill. I mean there's a lot of secret sauces, but you know the the one of them is you got to know your finances right, and that took me, in all transparency, that took me a long time to get that. You know, my business consultant would show me a P andl in. My eyes would laser over and I was like what the Hella? Like, okay, that's nice, I'll go fileot. We got to keep hitting the road, you know. And and until probably the last few couple years, I saw how important reading my financial statements and knowing what a balance sheet was and knowing what the PANL and how that's the pulse of Your Business, because you can be a fifteen million dollar company but you have negative income and your net income right, you're screwed. It's that it's a whole idea that you're driving revenue and you're out there, you're building this business and all your worried about is that top line and you forget about the bottom line. Yeah, and knowing the difference between the two. That's the most important line. HMM. Who cares what you're doing at the top because of the bottom isn't making you any money, you're not having any success. Yeah, at the end of the day. Yeah, that's very, very true. Yeah, and helping helping them understand that and to put their finances first and to also hold them accountable. Well, you said you were going to do this, this and this by this date. I expect you to do that. You know and have your word means something. Mean what you say. That's that I mean. If we would just do that, we'd be ahead of the game. But the process you talked about, you know the right processes for your business. What about out at home? What about their the life? Because you know, when you're running a company you're very focused, but at the same time you've got a usually a home life and a family life and your especially when their mom's the balance. What do you would you encourage people or point them in the direction to do or you...

...know, balance is I look at it like a seesaw. You know that we teeter and totter and there's there's definitely times where work gets ninety five to a hundred percent and there's other times where, you know, and I'm at a point in my career where I don't want to miss my daughter's softball games and I'm not going to. It's not worth it to me. The tradeoff is not worth it, and if that means I miss a speaking opportunity or miss you know whatever, so be it, because that's my priority. So that's today. So if you look back when you started the company, is it different today than it was then? Or did it? Was it this? It was, absolutely it was. My husband is the most supportive. Like I remember back when we started and I was covered, you know, had the covers over my head, just cry and just saying I can't do it, I can't do it, and he would pull the covers back after he'd worked the night shift at the office Max where House and Garland, and pull the covers back and he'd be like Courtney, get up. If it was easy, everyone would do it and get your ass out of bed, because people are counting on you. So He's been my biggest cheerleader, my biggest advocate, but there were so many nights where I'd be up at kids care off as billing and, you know, trying to make payroll and figure all the processes out and just because we were growing so freaking fast and he he had homebase covered. Well, yeah, I mean we had a nanny to at the time. I mean when we when we started, we had in home daycare, but I only took a week and a half off from eternity leave for my grace, my because she's sixteen and my company sixteen. Her Birthdays July first and we opened October. Twenty seven. Wow, yeah, nobody questions my sanity. Are there parts of your daily routine that you consider essential to, you know, being a successful person? There's things that you would recommend to other people that want to be leaders that you say, I do this every day because it puts me in the right mindset or, you know, this gets me on track for the day, or there anythings like that? I make sure I go to bed at ten o'clock every night, like sleep is not optional, and I wake up at six, you know, ord and thirty to just make sure that I can be available and help my kids get out the door. And you know, one one non negotiable is the Diet Coke at waterburger drives through clearly stag water burgers. Yeah, this is an audio medium, but there's a large water burger comes on, very large water burger. Yes, yeah, that that's in the book. The key to Suxxists Big Cup of a lot of it. It's like coffee in the morning or and everybody has their little thing that they do and I think when you you start a company, that's what you do and then after fifteen years you look back and go, I'm not doing that anymore, I'm not going to do that, and I have regrets like that where I wish I didn't do that at the time. But starting a business, running a business, worrying about payroll at night, financial statements, all of that comes into play. It's very, very difficult and stressful m day in a day out, to starting something and what you've done is amazing. To not only do that, I mean just that's one part books, mentoring, helping. It really is amazing. When you look at it, think it's a great it's an incredible story because it's someone actually walk the walk and can talk...

...to talk, and that's what frustrates me about business coaches sometimes, because everyone in their dog seems to be a business coach right now, and I'm just like, you know what it you can't tell people how to build a multi don't million dollar company if you've never built a multimillion dollar cuts a hundred percent correct. Yeah, I can teach you out of a book all day long, but if you're doing my you know, brain surgery, I want to make sure you had experience doing it, not just read it out of a book. You know, I can, I can buy that. I will not be teaching anybody how to start a multimillion dollar company. This is the last person you want, yeah, to do that. Yeah, and you're exactly right. You want that person that has been there. Yeah, and again, you live the pain. MM. When? What was? When was your first job? Fifteen, I was a checker at minyards food store and CEEREAL Texas. Okay, I love it. Yeah, I always ask people about that. Five dollars an hour and then I waited tables. Yeah, yeah, that was a fun one. That was real fun. You know, if you're going to this is my psa if you're going to screw with someone, don't let it be your waiter or waitress, because they have control over your food. Like be kind your and your your person who's cutting your hair. Be Kind, right. Yeah, yeah, it's your food, because you ever make that mistake, because it sounds like maybe, no, I didn't make the mistake, but that was that mistake. Was Happened? Has Happened to me? Yeah, yeah, and let me tell you. Seventeen, eighteen year old Courtney Baker, Courtney Durrett, at the time, was a spite a little bitch. I'll be like, you want what? Okay, I'll make sure that happens. Yes, so when you think about five years down the road, ten years down or what I mean, what do you want? Where do you where do you want to be? What do you want to do? Ten years down the road, I will probably be grandma coco by them, and that's great. That's fine with me, because my sound is twenty six now and I want to just, you know, keep keep inspiring and and encouraging women to be more and do more. My daughter's five or ten years, my daughters will be twenty six and twenty two. So hopefully I'll be an empty nest right speaking that into existence, I have will, I will be an empty Nester and you know, my husband and I, we've never not had kids as much as I adore my kids. So it's like what we can like go play and and have like whatever. You know, have rest house, my rest, so you actually have time to lay around and I do anything. Yeah, it's actually fun. Yeah, I can't wait. I mean I can, I can, but my little boogers are worth it. But yeah, it'll be it'll be fun. And the mentoring thing that you do, how do you find these people or how do they find you? I mean a lot of its word of mouth and then on online circles. It's funny because I've got people all over the US that I mentor and help them build their businesses. But I mean we've seen some incredible success. One of my the first girl that I'm mentored, her name is Valerie, and she was like just I one day my s I'll start a company, and I was like, why are you waiting? And she was working at a PR company and we started in September. Eighteen of two thousand and eighteen was her first day on the job, her first like she opened which, incredibly, is the was the six year anniversary of a massive stroke that I had when I in September eighteen of two thousand and twelve. Wow. So it was just serendipitous that she calls...

...them her grand baby business. My grandbaby business is her company. HMM. Yeah, so she her first year in business, hit over six figures her first year. Wow. And then my second Mente, is a wedding planner and Austin, and she'd only been in business for six months, her first six months, and had made twenty eight thousand dollars. And I said, Kara, let me help you and took her on and her goal when she wrote it, she was so scared, but she was like, I want to hit a hundred thousand my first, you know, my first year, full year, and we in two thousand and nineteen hit a hundred thousand. Wow, after only being at twenty eight her first, you know, six months. That's that's really awesome. Oh Yeah, when along the line did you realize I'm really good at this, I should write a book and tell other people had to do this. You know, my book is more of my research and the challenges that women go through and the strategies to get beyond those challenges. Because what's what good is it knowing what the challenges are if you don't have an action plan to sure to scale it? So that's what I wanted to do. But then I realized, because I met Valerie when I was speaking one day, and I realized, like you know, I can help them with the confidence piece, with the business aspect, and and really help women start businesses. So I've only been doing that for the last year. HMM. Wow, that's awesome. Yeah, it's just an interesting path. Yeah, it's kind of that giving back. Yeah, anyway, is make which is kind of the service piece, I guess. HMM, when we think about giving I mean you ran the you started a business, you've gone through this whole almost life. HMM, and and now you're giving back, and such a rewarding experience to be able to give that back. HMM. I am the cat with nine lives. I am like, this is life number three. Actually, I live on twenty percent and I'll tell you there's a there's an interesting story about that. So when my daughter it was two thousand and five, so grace was only a couple of years old, and I had a pulmonary embolism and it is a blood clot in your lungs and thirty percent of the people die before they get to the hospital. Right. So I was like, all right, God, you know I'm an overachiever, but if I take a hundred percent and I subtract thirty percent, I'm living on seventy percent. Like that. I'm an a student. What is going on here? And so I was like, okay, I can live on seventy percent. That's passing. And then I had the stroke, and it was a stroke in two places and fifty percent of the people die before they get to the hospital. And then had that, had the brain surgery, and so I was like Shit, now I'm on twenty percent. That's not good odds. So I'm making the most of twenty percent. My son said stats don't work like that, and I'm like, I'm not asking you. You call me Dr Mom. That's right, that's right, that's right. Sous were like you need to buy some lottery tickets as well. Exactly. Let's all go in on those lottery tip of as. I think they're walking to its sounds like I did. I just think you know, when you hear the story of it, you you you lived it, you're passionate about it. That's the difference. HMM. And at the end of the day, it is there, really is. And and I know when you look at entrepreneurs that that build something created, they're passionate, and it's not just this. They're passionate about everything in life and everything they touch and they're thankful for what they have because they've they've come from nothing and built in sometimes go back to having nothing to have to do it again. Yeah,...

...and you don't give up. Yeah, the drive and yeah, and you know, I mean I'm in health care, right. So healthcare is also in, we never know, in the back pocket of the government, right, and so that's a great thing to ask about. I mean, how concerned are you? How concerned were you when the original affordable carect kind of came out? was that something you were worried that your business going to be controlled by the government? They're going to take it away, you're going to be limited on your growth or what you can do or well, and you know, I mean it's ACA is like no one. It's kind of like the the wizard of alls and no one really knows what's going on behind the curtain. And we you know, we were also funded by Medicaid. So there's not only that, but there's the state component of it, because Medicare is federal Medicaid estate. So we do we take Medicaid, commercial insurance and private pay. And you know, a couple of years ago it was our reimbursement rates were cut overnight by twenty seven percent and there was a long time that my husband and I went without a paycheck and we had to really figure out like how to level the ground and make sure that as many people could keep their jobs as possible. And it was a rough two thousand and seventeen. I mean it was it was very, very rough, and we moved out of our house and we've since moved back into our house, but it's like, at the end of the day, I wanted to make sure that those at that point, it was like five hundred employees, still a large payill yeah, could get paid and, you know, tell their kids know there will be food on this table right, because that's a huge responsibility and I consider that an honor to be able to but it's also scary as hell. So today, when you look at the political situation the country and then the discussion again, obviously about healthcare. MMM, that concern you too? I mean, is it something that's yeah, I mean it's always a concern in the back of my mind. But you know, all I can do is plan and based on the best information that we have, and so I look to my leadership team a lot, I mean every day, to say, okay, what are we going to do, and they help drive our decisions and then they come to me and say this is our plan and and I just okay, let's roll. That's the best way to do it almost brings us around to a really nice like where we started, when you have a good leadership team that you can rely on, of people that you feel really, really comfortable about. You know how smart they are, how intelligent, how reliable. Then you feel good about taking them you know these issues in these problems and saying, guys, what are we going to do about this, and you've built this awesome team that's around you that then supported. Just is so much about the people, hmm. It is. And the other thing, you know, because I call entrepreneurship the roller coaster. Before that roller coaster, there was a point, and I'm trying to remember, we had about four hundred employees at that point. But I remember, you know, hearing all of the buzz about what was coming down on the pipe and I was just like walking, pacing in my kitchen at zero in the morning. What am I going to do? What am I going to do? What am I going to do? And this is before my leadership team was really developed as it they are now, and I just remember pacing, just going my God, what am I going to do? And I...

...audibly heard God say to me, when have I ever not taking care of you, and I was just like never, I'm going to be just fine, I'm trusting you. So it is kids cares, God's company. I was just put there to to to man the ship. You're the goalie, I the fucking play yeah, I'm the head cheer leader. That's right, I like, it's fantastic. I just I love it. Yeah, really do. Thank you. Yeah, this has been a blast. Just Hey, just a lot to learn from and this has been a lot, a lot of fun. So thank you, joed. It a lot. Thanks for having me. Absolutely absolutely, Shia. Very much. Yeah, Dr Corney Baker, where can people find more about you, more information on you? Buy Books, you know, learns are on Amazon and they can listen to the women in business podcast, because that's my show. Nice. She was on the big girl's pants to yes, I was the big girl pants podcast, Melton, just not too long ago, to your great podcast to listen to us. Actually, that was actually that one was hilarious, to be honest. It was. Was a lot more. There's no talent. What we talked about was craziness. I love listened to it a couple times. Oh my God. Well, thank you. Thank you very much. To bring it back full circle to a cool thing about Valerie, which was your first mentee, she actually worked a means event. Oh really. Yes, her company was hired. LUMO's creative was hired by a mean for the FIRSTCO digital summit, okay, which was so cool. I just I love I mean was on our show. I love saying I mean bent to horror. I will saying his name. Not only that, but he's also like the richest family in Morocco, by the way. I will sure. Yeah, I know we've found a lot of interesting things about people. Yeah, we did. You Know Mark Cuban? I do not, but you know, six degrees of separation or seven degrees is so what we are trying that and if I was smart I probably said, you know, Kevin Bacon. That would make more sense too, but I don't him to hard. Yeah, that's what I'm weird training order. That's why I'm away from him that far. We're going to figure this out. Yeah, okay, we're going to. We're going to figure this out. Well, thank you again so much for joining us today. It's been an absolute pleasure. Thank you. Thanks for having me. Absolutely and bill will be back soon with another episode. Everyone subscribe on itunes and spotify, Google podcast, all the good places. Thanks everybody. Yeah, thanks everybody.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (16)